Bioeconomy, Health and Climate Change

----------------------------

Parallel Workshops III, 20th April, 11:00 – 13:00 / Track: "Innovation & Environment"

----------------------------

Co-chairs

  • Andrew Haines, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
  • Jos Lelieveld, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry


Rapporteur

  • Jos Lelieveld, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry

 

Abstract

The workshop will address new research on the health co-benefits of greenhouse gas emission mitigation technologies and policies particularly due to reduced air pollution and improved diets. Public health has become a key driver for climate and environment policy as evidenced for example by its increasing profile at the UNFCCC COPs. Up to now, the bioeconomy policy agenda has largely ignored intersections with health policy. On the one hand, traditional bioeconomy sectors such as agriculture, food and forestry have a significant impact on air quality and emissions. New research shows that agriculture is not only a significant greenhouse gas emitter, but also contributes to hazardous air pollution. Food and agriculture are also major contributors to nutrition-related health outcomes and the spread of infectious diseases. On the other hand, several solutions and approaches are available to prevent these negative impacts on human and environmental health. Bioeconomy and circular economy approaches for example seek to reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, by developing alternatives to fossil fuel and solid biomass burning. The workshop will discuss how bioeconomy and circular economy innovations might contribute to valid solutions that support progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals, including on health, nutrition, agriculture, energy and cities.

Agenda

5 impulse speakers presenting new research, data and example solutions. These will be followed by team work. Each team (6 - 8 people) will identify and discuss bioeconomy implications and solutions based on a structured approach, whereby they will be asked to elaborate on ideas and answers in response to 3 pre-defined questions. This allows to address several questions within a set time of 45 minutes. The team leaders will then report back to the audience.

Guiding questions

  1. What are the health consequences of climate change and air pollution today and what are long-term risks? What are the critical linkages?
  2. What impact of bioeconomic and circular economy transformations can we expect on air quality and health?
  3. What solutions shall be considered, i.e. what political / societal / technological innovations are necessary to reduce air pollution and GHG emissions in order to improve public health?”

 

Speakers

  • Dr. Hanna L. Tuomisto, Senior Researcher, Ruralia Institute, University of Helsinki, Finland
  • Hannelore Daniel, German Bioeconomy Council, Professor and Chair of Nutrition Physiology, TUM Technical University Munich, Germany
  • Alisher Mirzabaev, lead author of the IPCC on climate change and desertification/ food security, Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn, Germany
  • Andrew Haines, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
  • Jos Lelieveld, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry